Japan #4- the G.O experience 

The most surprising thing about Japan isn’t the technologically advanced toilets or the marvellous hospitality, for me it is the quality of their chicken. The local chicken restaurant in a town called Shintoku is genuinely a mind-blowing experience that tantalises taste buds and defies man’s culinary law, it is so good that at any opportunity I get I find myself sat on the floor of this incredible institute drooling over the variety of chicken that Colonel Sander’s wet dreams are made of. In typical Japanese style, the efficiency of this enticing establishment is as stunning as its poultry produce, with every single ounce of meat from the tongue to the heart being expertly utilised to deliver a delicious dining experience. The way that every serving of fried chicken brings with it the perfect ratio of juicy succulence and greasy skin and every skewer is complete with faultless sprinkling of salt is indescribable. I am still so tremendously in awe of this chicken that once, in the few hours I get between ski instructing and my evening shift, I have journeyed into town to spread the gospel of this heavenly meat manipulation by bringing a wonderful family of Australian guests to this temple of taste.
I know this fifty shades of chicken description may appear to be a drastic hyperbole but it is very rare that I get to lave the confines of the Club Med village at which I work, so every trip into the outside world is an ecstatic relief from that bubble. Don’t get me wrong, I love my job, but is surprisingly full on so to be able to venture into the real Japan and escape the roles of a G.O for a night is a much-needed reprieve. I am only surprised at how full on the role is because of my own naivety. It may sound daft but when I applied for the job I had never heard of Club Med and knew nothing about its crazy and unique world, and what the role of G.O entailed. A naivety supplemented by the inaccurate and misguided information provided to me by the training company which I signed up through. The most shocking of which was finding out that the evening interactions are mandatory, meaning all staff must have dinner with the guests, clap in a scarily synchronized manner through the show and then stay at the bar unless given the night off. The latter of which being the largest struggle, especially the following morning and may be the cause of some people’s alcohol dependency issues. Sure, it’s a great job to get paid to ski and drink, but one that requires serious stamina and the belief that a hangover is a choice, as a wise man once said. Having lunch and dinner every day with guests also seemed like an odd idea. As an Englishman I, naturally, have a rather reserved disposition and the thought of joining a family for their meal on their holiday appeared rather invasive, and did take some getting used to but that is what the guests expect on their Club Med holiday. The level of interactivity of working at such a place was unexpected, being an entertainer and socialiser on top of being a ski instructor. Spending more time around the dinner table and at the bar than teaching on the slopes was quite a surprise.
Instructing itself is wonderful. Teaching people what I am passionate about and what I love and seeing that passion develop in them is a great feeling, as well as watching them progress throughout the day and enjoy sliding down the slopes. Actually being able to effectively divulge information to aid others development in a technical or fun way is incredibly intrinsically rewarding, and it is jut nice to not be useless at something. The perks around this are great too, being a G.O does come with the remarkable benefits of being able to use all the facilities of the hotel. Being able to use the outdoor hot tub and the pool, as well as the fitness centre and ski rental does aid the post work recovery and assist relaxing after teaching a group of Jerries. Eating the same food as the guests is another brilliant bonus. An all you can eat buffet for each meal, supplemented by specialty chefs and an ice cream machine is amazing, and dangerously unhealthy. Despite the quality of the catering, it still is nice to escape to the welcoming retreat of the chicken restaurant. 

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